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Daniel Brown’s Cinderella story continues at The Open, contends with 18 to play

Daniel Brown’s persistence continues to pay off at The Open as the first-time participant remains in contention ahead of championship Sunday.
He was one of the main storylines of Saturday’s round as a short video of Brown went viral for smoking a dart and taking selfies with fans.
His Cinderella story is not over as he sits one shot behind the leader, Billy Horschel. The former Florida Gator signed for a 2-under 69 to sit at 4-under overall.
Brown carded a 2-over 73 for his third round, which included five birdies, five bogeys, and a double-bogey on the 18th.
He did not finish well, but for the most part, Brown managed the pressure well enough to stay in the hunt.
“Proud of how I handled myself, but a bit of a sting on them last two holes through not hitting a bad golf shot,” Brown said.
“Links golf got the better of me on them two holes.”
It may be his first major Championship, but Brown chose not to focus on that. Keeping that pressure off his chest has allowed him to stay comfortable.
“It’s not a normal week, but I feel like mentally I’ve been in a place where I’ve treated it like a normal week on the DP World Tour,” he said.
“I’ve not made it feel any bigger than what it is, and it is a lot bigger. I think I can have a good go tomorrow.”

Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Brown voiced his opinion of the course setup like his playing partner Shane Lowry, who led after 54 holes but unraveled down the back nine. Dustin Johnson also explained how difficult that stretch of golf was.
How hard was that back nine? Players used drivers on multiple holes that generally require a mid- or long-iron.
“There were two or three of those par-4s I couldn’t even get to,” Brown explained.
“Hit driver on 17. Course setup probably wasn’t thought about too much this morning when that weather came in. We got the wrong end of the draw, but we were up there to begin with anyway.”
The Open qualifier has not had the best year. Brown missed eight cuts in a row before he finished 61st last week at the Genesis Scottish Open.
Many players would fold under this kind of pressure, but not Brown. He knows his experiences can help him during a week like The Open.
“I suppose a lot of people probably thought I was going to be shaking this morning and nervous, but I’ve been absolutely fine,” Brown said.
“I am quite a calm, relaxed person anyway, but I think I’ve had enough experiences on the DP World Tour and sort of my journey through golf to know how to handle these situations. I’ve failed before, and I think that’s what’s stood me in good stead for being here.”
The 29-year-old will play with World No. 1 Scottie Scheffler for the final 18 holes at The Open Championship. They tee off at 8:55 a.m. ET.
Savannah Leigh Richardson is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. For more golf coverage, follow us @_PlayingThrough on all major social platforms. You can also follow her on Twitter @SportsGirlSL and Instagram @golf_girl_sl. […]

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Daniel Brown’s Cinderella story continues at The Open, contends with 18 to play

Daniel Brown’s persistence continues to pay off at The Open as the first-time participant remains in contention ahead of championship Sunday.
He was one of the main storylines of Saturday’s round as a short video of Brown went viral for smoking a dart and taking selfies with fans.
His Cinderella story is not over as he sits one shot behind the leader, Billy Horschel. The former Florida Gator signed for a 2-under 69 to sit at 4-under overall.
Brown carded a 2-over 73 for his third round, which included five birdies, five bogeys, and a double-bogey on the 18th.
He did not finish well, but for the most part, Brown managed the pressure well enough to stay in the hunt.
“Proud of how I handled myself, but a bit of a sting on them last two holes through not hitting a bad golf shot,” Brown said.
“Links golf got the better of me on them two holes.”
It may be his first major Championship, but Brown chose not to focus on that. Keeping that pressure off his chest has allowed him to stay comfortable.
“It’s not a normal week, but I feel like mentally I’ve been in a place where I’ve treated it like a normal week on the DP World Tour,” he said.
“I’ve not made it feel any bigger than what it is, and it is a lot bigger. I think I can have a good go tomorrow.”

Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Brown voiced his opinion of the course setup like his playing partner Shane Lowry, who led after 54 holes but unraveled down the back nine. Dustin Johnson also explained how difficult that stretch of golf was.
How hard was that back nine? Players used drivers on multiple holes that generally require a mid- or long-iron.
“There were two or three of those par-4s I couldn’t even get to,” Brown explained.
“Hit driver on 17. Course setup probably wasn’t thought about too much this morning when that weather came in. We got the wrong end of the draw, but we were up there to begin with anyway.”
The Open qualifier has not had the best year. Brown missed eight cuts in a row before he finished 61st last week at the Genesis Scottish Open.
Many players would fold under this kind of pressure, but not Brown. He knows his experiences can help him during a week like The Open.
“I suppose a lot of people probably thought I was going to be shaking this morning and nervous, but I’ve been absolutely fine,” Brown said.
“I am quite a calm, relaxed person anyway, but I think I’ve had enough experiences on the DP World Tour and sort of my journey through golf to know how to handle these situations. I’ve failed before, and I think that’s what’s stood me in good stead for being here.”
The 29-year-old will play with World No. 1 Scottie Scheffler for the final 18 holes at The Open Championship. They tee off at 8:55 a.m. ET.
Savannah Leigh Richardson is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. For more golf coverage, follow us @_PlayingThrough on all major social platforms. You can also follow her on Twitter @SportsGirlSL and Instagram @golf_girl_sl. […]

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Billy Horschel on precipice of career-changing Open win; seizes 54-hole lead

Major championship victories define a golfer’s legacy, so it’s no wonder why Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods rank as the two greatest golfers of all time. Nicklaus won 18, while Woods captured 15, with his most recent coming at Augusta National in 2019.
Billy Horschel, meanwhile, has never won a major and has never really come close to doing so. His best result came at the 2013 U.S. Open at Merion, where he tied for fourth. Horschel actually held a share of the 36-hole lead with Phil Mickelson then, but Justin Rose went on to win in Philadelphia.
All these years later, Horschel holds a one-shot lead at The 152nd Open Championship after 54 holes, thanks to a superb 2-under 69 on Saturday.
He prevailed in the battle against the elements, even turning his cap around to avoid raindrops. But his short game worked wonders, especially on the back nine, as Horschel made clutch par save after par save while fellow contenders stumbled around him.

The former Florida Gator did bogey the 11th and 18th holes, yet everyone dropped a shot somewhere on the back nine. But now Horschel, at 37 years old, has the opportunity of a lifetime. He has the chance to change the course of his career and become a major champion.
“I’ve worked my entire life to be in this position,” Horschel said after.
“I’ve been in the lead many times going into a final round. Obviously, this is a major. It means a little bit more. We all know that. We know what this means to everyone. I know what it means to my legacy in golf and what I want to do and accomplish. But I’m excited to be here. I’ve wanted to be here my entire life. I’m finally here. I’m embracing it.”
Horschel posted a solid finish earlier in the year at the PGA Championship, tying for eighth. He also made the cut at the U.S. Open, tying for 41st at Pinehurst. But before that solid performance at Valhalla in May, Horschel’s last top 10 in a major came way back at Merion—the first major he played professionally. He certainly had some struggles in between then, notably at the Memorial last year, where he began Jack Nicklaus’ event with an eye-opening 84.
But he does have eight PGA Tour victories to his name, including this year at the Corales Puntacana Championship.
“Something I’ve done this year, and I’ve done a better job this week of it, or tried to do a better job, is sort of manifest seeing myself holding the trophy before I go to sleep every night, envisioning myself holding that trophy on 18, walking out to the crowd and being congratulated as Open champion,” Horschel said.

Billy Horschel lines up a putt on Saturday at Royal Troon.

Photo by Zac Goodwin/Getty Images

“That’s what I’m going to do again tonight, and hopefully that comes true [on Sunday]. If it doesn’t, then I’ll get back on the grind and work harder to get back in a position like this again.”
Horschel has worked tirelessly this year to get back to the pinnacle of the sport, where he was in 2014 when he won the FedEx Cup title. But he has also learned quite a bit about himself after spending nearly 15 years out on tour.
“I think I’ve learned how to handle my emotions. I’ve learned how to embrace a lot of things—I’m not saying I’m afraid of failing. I’m never afraid to fail. I think I hate when I don’t do well and I get criticism from outside, and I’m letting those criticisms affect my vision of myself,” Horschel explained.
“So yeah, I think, if it’s my time tomorrow, it’s my time, and I’m going to be ecstatic. If it’s not, then we’ll get on the horse again, and we’ll work hard to get back in that position again.”
Horschel hoisting the Claret Jug on Sunday would undoubtedly lead to a glorious celebration for him and his family. But he is also well aware that he can just as easily come up short. That’s the game of golf. So many outside factors go into determining major championships. A healthy dose of luck is involved, too. Horschel knows that, which explains why he is content with who he is and how his career has played out to date.

Billy Horschel during the third round at Royal Troon.

Photo by Oisin Keniry/R&A via Getty Images

“I look at guys that have had heck of careers, Lee Westwood, Steve Stricker, who else am I going to forget in there? I’m sure there’s a couple other guys in there that haven’t won majors, that have had really quality careers, and they don’t have a major on their record,” Horschel said.
“Understanding that it’s okay if a major is not in the cards, but it doesn’t mean that I’m not going to work my butt off and do everything I can to sort of change that.”
Hard work almost always pays off, but a positive attitude and a remarkable short game also pay dividends in major championships.
Horschel has had that all week, but his play around the greens has been remarkable. He has gotten up and down out of Royal Troon’s treacherous pot bunkers 8-out-of-8 times. Horschel also leads the field in overall strokes gained this week, a testament to how everything is clicking for him.
But now, the question is, can Horschel keep it going for one more day?
If he does, his career will undoubtedly change.
For the better.
Jack Milko is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. Be sure to check out @_PlayingThrough for more golf coverage. You can follow him on Twitter @jack_milko as well. […]

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Billy Horschel on precipice of career-changing Open win; seizes 54-hole lead

Major championship victories define a golfer’s legacy, so it’s no wonder why Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods rank as the two greatest golfers of all time. Nicklaus won 18, while Woods captured 15, with his most recent coming at Augusta National in 2019.
Billy Horschel, meanwhile, has never won a major and has never really come close to doing so. His best result came at the 2013 U.S. Open at Merion, where he tied for fourth. Horschel actually held a share of the 36-hole lead with Phil Mickelson then, but Justin Rose went on to win in Philadelphia.
All these years later, Horschel holds a one-shot lead at The 152nd Open Championship after 54 holes, thanks to a superb 2-under 69 on Saturday.
He prevailed in the battle against the elements, even turning his cap around to avoid raindrops. But his short game worked wonders, especially on the back nine, as Horschel made clutch par save after par save while fellow contenders stumbled around him.

The former Florida Gator did bogey the 11th and 18th holes, yet everyone dropped a shot somewhere on the back nine. But now Horschel, at 37 years old, has the opportunity of a lifetime. He has the chance to change the course of his career and become a major champion.
“I’ve worked my entire life to be in this position,” Horschel said after.
“I’ve been in the lead many times going into a final round. Obviously, this is a major. It means a little bit more. We all know that. We know what this means to everyone. I know what it means to my legacy in golf and what I want to do and accomplish. But I’m excited to be here. I’ve wanted to be here my entire life. I’m finally here. I’m embracing it.”
Horschel posted a solid finish earlier in the year at the PGA Championship, tying for eighth. He also made the cut at the U.S. Open, tying for 41st at Pinehurst. But before that solid performance at Valhalla in May, Horschel’s last top 10 in a major came way back at Merion—the first major he played professionally. He certainly had some struggles in between then, notably at the Memorial last year, where he began Jack Nicklaus’ event with an eye-opening 84.
But he does have eight PGA Tour victories to his name, including this year at the Corales Puntacana Championship.
“Something I’ve done this year, and I’ve done a better job this week of it, or tried to do a better job, is sort of manifest seeing myself holding the trophy before I go to sleep every night, envisioning myself holding that trophy on 18, walking out to the crowd and being congratulated as Open champion,” Horschel said.

Billy Horschel lines up a putt on Saturday at Royal Troon.

Photo by Zac Goodwin/Getty Images

“That’s what I’m going to do again tonight, and hopefully that comes true [on Sunday]. If it doesn’t, then I’ll get back on the grind and work harder to get back in a position like this again.”
Horschel has worked tirelessly this year to get back to the pinnacle of the sport, where he was in 2014 when he won the FedEx Cup title. But he has also learned quite a bit about himself after spending nearly 15 years out on tour.
“I think I’ve learned how to handle my emotions. I’ve learned how to embrace a lot of things—I’m not saying I’m afraid of failing. I’m never afraid to fail. I think I hate when I don’t do well and I get criticism from outside, and I’m letting those criticisms affect my vision of myself,” Horschel explained.
“So yeah, I think, if it’s my time tomorrow, it’s my time, and I’m going to be ecstatic. If it’s not, then we’ll get on the horse again, and we’ll work hard to get back in that position again.”
Horschel hoisting the Claret Jug on Sunday would undoubtedly lead to a glorious celebration for him and his family. But he is also well aware that he can just as easily come up short. That’s the game of golf. So many outside factors go into determining major championships. A healthy dose of luck is involved, too. Horschel knows that, which explains why he is content with who he is and how his career has played out to date.

Billy Horschel during the third round at Royal Troon.

Photo by Oisin Keniry/R&A via Getty Images

“I look at guys that have had heck of careers, Lee Westwood, Steve Stricker, who else am I going to forget in there? I’m sure there’s a couple other guys in there that haven’t won majors, that have had really quality careers, and they don’t have a major on their record,” Horschel said.
“Understanding that it’s okay if a major is not in the cards, but it doesn’t mean that I’m not going to work my butt off and do everything I can to sort of change that.”
Hard work almost always pays off, but a positive attitude and a remarkable short game also pay dividends in major championships.
Horschel has had that all week, but his play around the greens has been remarkable. He has gotten up and down out of Royal Troon’s treacherous pot bunkers 8-out-of-8 times. Horschel also leads the field in overall strokes gained this week, a testament to how everything is clicking for him.
But now, the question is, can Horschel keep it going for one more day?
If he does, his career will undoubtedly change.
For the better.
Jack Milko is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. Be sure to check out @_PlayingThrough for more golf coverage. You can follow him on Twitter @jack_milko as well. […]

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Shane Lowry stumbles out of Open lead, round unravels after ‘The Postage Stamp’

Shane Lowry entered Saturday’s round of the Open Championship with a three-shot lead but walked off the golf course trailing by three. Royal Troon’s conditions finally got the best of him.
He carded a 6-over 77 to drop to 1-under total, plummeting him to solo ninth on the leaderboard. Billy Horschel leads the field by one after he fired off a 2-under 69 to get to a 4-under overall.
Lowry started strong on Saturday, but things began to unravel once he reached the par-3 8th, better known as ‘The Postage Stamp.’
“Honestly, it was brutal,” Lowry said.
“For me, the 8th hole was killer, really. Make par there, and you can still shoot 3 or 4-over and still be leading the tournament. Just pulled my wedge shot there. Look, I don’t know what to say. It was a grind. It wasn’t much fun.”

Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

The 2019 Open champion made a double bogey on that tiny 130-yard par-3 and did not recover.
Lowry dropped two more shots on the 11th and 12th. He made par on the par-4 13th but dropped two more strokes on 14 and 15. Lowry had 21 feet for par on the 18th, but his ball came up just short, which caused him to drop one more spot.
He explained how he had to use the driver so much on the back nine, which can be tricky on a links golf course.
“You’re standing on the 18th tee wondering if you can actually hit the fairway if you can reach the fairway, and it’s 230 yards to the fairway,” he said. “Bear in mind my driver pitched about 220 yards on the 17th hole. So, yeah, it’s not much fun out there.”
Like Dustin Johnson, many players described the back nine as some of the most challenging golf they have ever played. Lowry seemingly agreed after his round as he vented his frustrations.
“It’s very difficult. But you’d have to question why there wasn’t a couple of tees put forward today, to be honest,” Lowry said.

Shane Lowry after Round Three.

Photo by Jane Barlow/Getty Images

“I think 15 and 17—like 15 is 500 yards playing into that wind, it’s—yeah, they keep trying to make holes longer, yet the best hole in this course is about 100 yards.”
The Irishman is three shots back, so he still has a shot at winning on Sunday, but he faces a much taller task.
“I have a job tomorrow and a similar chance to win this tournament,” he said.
“Look, there’s no doubt I’m going to go out there tomorrow thinking I can win the tournament, but it’s just hard right now.”
Lowry stated he needed a couple of hours to process and prepare for the final day of play.
He will play alongside Adam Scott at 8:45 a.m. ET in the final round.
Savannah Leigh Richardson is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. For more golf coverage, follow us @_PlayingThrough on all major social platforms. You can also follow her on Twitter @SportsGirlSL and Instagram @golf_girl_sl. […]

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Scottie Scheffler’s putter goes ice cold, but near ace at The Open has him lurking at Royal Troon

Scottie Scheffler did not make a single putt over eight feet on Saturday at Royal Troon, yet the World No. 1 is two back of 54-hole leader Billy Horschel at The Open Championship.
He is lurking, mainly because of his incredible play from tee to green, which was on full display at the brutal par-3 17th. This 238-yard beast played straight into the prevailing breeze, a near-impossible circumstance that left dozens of players helpless on the tee.
But not Scheffler.
He piped a 3-wood within inches of the cup, coming close to following Si Woo Kim, who made an ace there earlier in the day.
Scheffler proceeded to tap in for birdie, his second and final par-breaker of his third round—a round in which he shot an even-par 71.

“I probably don’t hit a 3-wood on a par-3 very often,” Scheffler said.
“I probably don’t hit driver and a 3-wood really solid on a par-4 and don’t get there in two, either.”
That is what happened to Scheffler on the 502-yard par-4 15th, another one of Royal Troon’s brutal par-4s that played well over par and into the prevailing breeze on Saturday. Other players even hit drivers off the deck into this hole and still came up short.
The weather once again made the best players look silly at The Open.
“Overall, the back nine, I think, was probably the hardest nine holes I’ll ever play,” Scheffler said.
“You never really know with the forecast, and there was some rain in the forecast, but it was supposed to be a southwest wind, which was similar to the wind we’ve had the last couple of days, and it came more directly into us on the back nine versus down off the left. It was definitely very challenging.”
Despite the difficulty, Scheffler ranked third among the field in strokes gained approaching the green, picking up more than three shots from the fairway. But he gave those shots right back with his putter, losing 3.20 strokes on the greens, good for 78th among the 80 players who made the cut. He could not make a putt on Saturday, throwing away birdie look after birdie look. His birdie tries on the 8th and 9th immediately come to mind.

Scottie Scheffler during Day Three at The 152nd Open.

Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

But Scheffler even missed a three-footer for par on 15, which dropped him back to 1-under for the championship.
“Other than the missed short putt on 15 there, where I got a bit distracted, it was a really solid back nine,” Scheffler said.
“Raindrops falling off the front of the cap got me in the middle of my stroke.”
Two holes later, Scheffler bounced back with one of the best shots of the championship on the 17th hole. He has done that all season, leading the PGA Tour in bounce-back percentage after making a rare mistake.
But part of what makes Scheffler so great is his mentality. He does not waver from the task unless raindrops distract him. Instead, he remains in the present and level-headed, even when his putter fails to cooperate.
“It can be frustrating, but I felt like today was another one of those days where I just did a really good job of not getting overly frustrated, staying in a good head space, and did a good job of really staying in the tournament,” Scheffler said.
“But my goal making the turn going into the back nine was to do what I could to stay in the tournament and steal some shots where I could, and there wasn’t really much to steal on the back nine, so it was good getting in.”
Scheffler played the final nine holes in 1-over-par, which is remarkable considering the circumstances. And he most certainly kept himself in it, as he lurks two back with 18 holes to play. Six players also sit in a tie for second at 3-under, meaning anything can happen on Sunday.
Regardless, everyone should watch out for Scheffler, especially with how he is hitting the ball from tee to green. Even on a day with wind, rain, and freezing cold temperatures, he still found 13-of-14 fairways and hit 14-of-18 greens. No matter the conditions, he flushes the ball on the center of the club face, which explains why he has won six times already this season.
But if he can make a couple of more putts during the final round, surely win number seven will come in the form of a Claret Jug.
Jack Milko is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. Be sure to check out @_PlayingThrough for more golf coverage. You can follow him on Twitter @jack_milko as well. […]

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Fans go crazy for Daniel Brown ripping darts, channels inner Charley Hull at The Open

Daniel Brown continues to be the Cinderella story of the 152nd Open Championship. On Saturday, he not only kept himself in contention but stole the hearts of many fans with one simple but relatable act.
Brown channeled his fellow Englishwoman, Charley Hull, and lit a cigarette while walking up the 18th hole. He also stopped by to take a selfie with fans beside the 18th fairway with that same cigarette dangling from his mouth.
Why smoking causes fans to lose their minds is uncertain, but it does.
Brown heads into Sunday one shot off the lead, as he made a double-bogey six on the last hole to drop from five to 3-under for the championship. Despite that, fans around the world will root him on, hoping for him to get the job done.
The video of Brown smoking went viral, and fans absolutely loved it. Let’s look at some of the best reactions to Brown, the 272nd ranked-player in the world, ripping darts and taking pictures with the fans.

X user Owen puts the situation in perspective. Brown is living the good life and enjoying himself during the third round of the Open Championship. Relatability seems to be what the fans want most, and Brown gave it to them.

Daniel Brown smoking a cigarette and taking a selfie with some fans.If that ain’t the good life, I don’t know what is. Love to see The Open leader having some fun on a Saturday.— Owen (@Alakazam_428) July 20, 2024

Another user called Brown a baller for “ripping darts on his walk up 18 while leading the Open.” Unfortunately, the 29-year-old Englishman suffered a bad break off the tee on the 18th, as his drive came to rest on the lip of a pot bunker. Despite that, he is one behind Billy Horschel after 54 holes, and Brown does not seem like an Open rookie but someone who has played in majors plenty of times.

Evidently, cigarettes, taking selfies, and playing in the Open are enough to gain fandom from this X user, and we do not fault him for it. Brown has played extremely well the last three days and could win the whole thing.

After seeing the viral video, Brendon Deeg, another X user, was ready to give Brown the trophy, which is not crazy to think about because he is still on the front page of the leaderboard.
Professional golfers are all so stoic and almost seem robotic most of the time. When one of them does something that ‘normal people’ do, fans seem to get excited.
Brown has 18 holes left in his Open Championship debut, and Sunday will see many more people rooting for him after that short clip of him ripping darts.
Savannah Leigh Richardson is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. For more golf coverage, follow us @_PlayingThrough on all major social platforms. You can also follow her on Twitter @SportsGirlSL and Instagram @golf_girl_sl. […]

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This Vintage Computing Device is No Baby Food

Today, if you want a computer for a particular task, you go shopping. But in the early days of computing, exotic applications needed custom computers. What’s more is that with the expense of computers, you likely got one made that fit exactly what you needed and no more. That led to many oddball one-off or nearly one-off computers during that time frame. Same for peripheral devices — you built what you had to and you left the rest on the drafting table. [Vintage Geek] got his hands on what appears to be one of them: the Gerber Scientific 6200.
While Gerber Scientific is still around, we’ve never heard of the 6200. Based on the serial number, we would guess at least 62 of them were made and this one has an interesting backstory of living in someone’s home who worked at the Pentagon. We presume the tapes were erased before it was sold!
Design-wise, it is pretty standard stuff. A 19-inch rack, a standard tape drive from Kennedy, a power supply, and some cards. The box takes 240 V, so the computer didn’t get powered up, but an examination of the inside looked like this really was a one-off with handwritten labels on masking tape.
We couldn’t tell for sure if the device was a computer itself, or just a tape drive and maybe plotter interface for another computer. If you know anything about this device, we are sure [Vintage Geek] would like to hear from you.
If this does turn out to have a CPU onboard, we’d bet it is bit sliced. If you have a 9-track tape machine, you may have to make your own tapes soon.

[embedded content] […]

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Xander Schauffele cards incredible 69, calls it one of his better rounds amid brutal weather

The weather turned for the worse at The Open Championship on Saturday afternoon, leaving the contenders struggling to survive.
Pars became nearly impossible to save, and birdies were an afterthought. But amid the fray, Xander Schauffele rose up the leaderboard with a marvelous 2-under 69 at Royal Troon.
“I’d say so, yes. It for sure was,” Schauffele said when asked if his third round was one of the best of his career.
“With everything at stake here and how the weather played from hole one basically and having to adjust, I would say it’s up there.”
Schauffele made four birdies over his first 10 holes to climb up to 5-under for the championship. He then held on for dear life on the back nine—a brutal stretch of golf—as he made two bogies over his final eight holes. He sits at 3-under through 54 holes, one back of leader Billy Horschel.

Xander Schauffele bogied the 18th hole on Saturday.

Photo by Zac Goodwin/Getty Images

Now, Schauffele has a tremendous opportunity to add another major championship, fresh off his maiden major win at the PGA Championship two months ago at Valhalla.
But will that help Schauffele down the stretch on Sunday?
“If I’d have to take a guess, I imagine it’s not going to hurt me,” Schauffele said.
“If I’m in that spot with a few holes to play, I think I can maybe lean on that. It’s just such a different style of golf. It’s such a different tournament. That’s the great thing about these majors. They’re very different, and it’s an honor to try to win them.”
Schauffele will no doubt lean on his experience, but he can rely on his exquisite play from tee to green just as much. He hit the ball beautifully on Saturday, ranking 10th in overall strokes gained during round three. That number may not sound that impressive, but considering the afternoon wave dealt with near-impossible conditions, it’s a solid attribute nonetheless.
“I enjoy the challenge,” Schauffele added.
“Everyone has parts of their job that they don’t like across the board. So I’m lucky. I’m still outside. I know it’s raining, but it’s a really nice thing for me to do, just try to test myself, and today was that.”
Jack Milko is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. Be sure to check out @_PlayingThrough for more golf coverage. You can follow him on Twitter @jack_milko as well. […]

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Toto Wolff blasts Mercedes’ ‘total underperformance’ as Lewis Hamilton and George Russell struggle

Mercedes entered the Hungarian Grand Prix on a high note, outscoring their rivals over the past four race weekends and capturing back-to-back victories with George Russell winning in Austria and Lewis Hamilton securing the win at Silverstone.
But if they are to win a third-straight race, it will take something special following the team’s “total underperformance” Saturday during qualifying for the Hungarian Grand Prix.
Russell was eliminated in Q1 following a “miscommunication,” and will start the Grand Prix back in 17th place. While Hamilton advanced to Q3 — only after a tense end to Q2 where he faced elimination in the closing moments — he lacked the pace of his competitors in the final segment of qualifying and will start fifth.
Following the session, Mercedes Team Principal Toto Wolff blasted the team’s performance.
“That was a very disappointing Qualifying session for us today. It was a total underperformance from all of us. Losing a car in Q1 is clearly not acceptable,” said the Mercedes boss in the team’s post-qualifying report. “George struggled to get in a solid lap earlier in the session and we didn’t execute the final run at all. That stemmed from a lack of solid communication between ourselves and the driver. We need to ensure we learn from this so that it doesn’t happen again.
“Lewis made it through to Q3 but ultimately, we didn’t have the pace to challenge for much more than P5. We were likely a couple of tenths slower than those ahead in normal conditions anyway, but we were struggling to get on top of the [tire] temperatures. It was tricky to find the middle ground and that likely cost us a few more tenths,” added Wolff.
For Russell, the driver did not put together the best lap early in Q1, and then due to a miscommunication with the team, he did not have the ideal fuel level for his last push lap.
The pieces added up to an elimination in Q1 for the winner of the Austrian Grand Prix.
“We didn’t do a good enough job today. I was unable to put a lap together earlier in Q1 and that had left us vulnerable near the cut-off. After the red flag, we were on track at its most damp and then we didn’t have enough fuel complete a push lap as it was at its most dry. We should have been comfortably through and that is frustrating,” said Russell. “We shouldn’t have been in that position though in the first place and that’s on me. We will go through it tonight to understand what happened, what went wrong, and how to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”
On the other side of the garage, Hamilton noted that even in the cooler conditions on Saturday — which tend to favor the W15 — the team struggled. And with higher temperatures forecast for Sunday, that could mean more hurdles for Mercedes in the Grand Prix itself.
“It’s been very difficult to find a balance with the car this weekend where it’s not snappy. That has likely been exacerbated by the heat but, even in the cooler conditions today, we still struggled,” said Hamilton. “It was a real challenge to get the tyres working and we couldn’t quite get them to where we wanted. If we had [optimized] everything, we could have likely gone one tenth or two quicker, but we didn’t have enough to challenge for pole position today.”
Still, the team is hopeful that they can bounceback tomorrow.
“We need to dust ourselves down and come back stronger tomorrow,” concluded Wolff. “It will be a long race so hopefully we can create some opportunities.” […]