Brockton Man Indicted for Unlawful Possession of Firearm and Ammunition

BOSTON – A previously convicted felon has been indicted by a federal grand jury in Boston for unlawfully possessing a Glock pistol and 18 rounds of ammunition.

Michael Whitfield, 42, of Brockton, was indicted on one count of being a felon in possession of firearms and ammunition. Whitfield was previously charged by criminal complaint on Sept. 13. 

According to the charging documents, on March 6, 2023, upon arrival at a motor vehicle accident scene in Brockton, law enforcement observed Whitfield in a vehicle with significant damage, its airbag deployed and a broken passenger door window. It is alleged that there was a strong odor of alcohol coming from inside the vehicle and an empty tequila bottle was observed on the passenger seat floor. It is further alleged that a Glock 19X .9mm pistol loaded with 18 rounds was found on the driver’s side floorboard between Whitfield’s legs. 

Due to a prior felony conviction stemming from 2006, Whitfield is prohibited from possessing firearms and ammunition.

The charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition provides for a sentence of up to 15 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of up to $250,000. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and statutes which govern the determination of a sentence in a criminal case.

Acting U.S. Attorney Joshua S. Levy and James M. Ferguson, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Boston Field Division, made the announcement today. Valuable assistance was provided by the Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office, the Massachusetts State Police, the Brockton Police Department and the Brockton Fire Department. Assistant U.S. Attorney Luke A. Goldworm of the Major Crimes Unit is prosecuting the case.

The details contained in the charging documents are allegations. The defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

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