Gen-Z Finds Anthem On TikTok. And They’re Rockin’ To This Anti-Work Song

An anti-work anthem has gone viral on the Chinese social media platform TikTok in recent days. This comes after youngsters have complained on social media about President Biden’s disastrous ‘Bidenomics’ policies that have sparked elevated inflation and crushed their financial mobility. 

The viral video, posted by TikTok user “tedymakesmusic,” has been viewed 1.4 million times and liked nearly a quarter million times.  

Here are the lyrics: 

I don’t want to contribute nothing to society.

I don’t struggle I don’t hustle.

If you want it, you can have it.

Sorry, I wasn’t born to Work. No, I wasn’t born to work. 

I’m too pretty to get dirty. Yeah, I said it. You can sue me. 

Don’t want to lift the finger. For the money. 

“Can every corporate worker please turn this on super loud at their desk????” one TikTok user said in the video’s comment section.

Another person said, “This Gen Z’s anthem.” 

“Me thinking about quitting my job & living out a van,” someone else said. 

Youngsters are starting to realize just how much the federal government, college, and the Federal Reserve are scams. These institutions are failing the youngsters and have provided them with worthless degrees and an economic environment that is some of the worst living conditions in a generation due to failed policies. Fed Chair Powell, you had one job – and one job only… 

Plus, woke leftist universities are indoctrinating multiple generations with collectivism, i.e., socialism, which has left some of these folks believing the government will be handing them stimmy checks (universal basic income) and student debt relief checks. Thanks to Powell and lawmakers on Capitol Hill, these kids got a taste of Covid helicopter money via stimmy checks and want more – instead of working. 

For those who don’t want to contribute to society and the economy, remember Goldman’s note from last year specifying that generative AI could displace hundreds of millions of jobs by the end of the decade. 

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